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Spelet Hector Macdonald

Spelet

Hector Macdonald

Published
ISBN :
Paperback
472 pages
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 About the Book 

When you think of game theory, do you think of chalk-dusty economists droning endlessly about the permutations of optimal outcomes and short-term payoffs? Perhaps not. But even if you do, Hector MacDonalds first novel will make this esoteric fieldMoreWhen you think of game theory, do you think of chalk-dusty economists droning endlessly about the permutations of optimal outcomes and short-term payoffs? Perhaps not. But even if you do, Hector MacDonalds first novel will make this esoteric field exotic, dangerous, and downright sexy. Ben Ashurst is a student at Oxford. He leads a fairly placid life, befriending shy girls, playing keep up with the Joneses with his crowd of wealthy (and nasty) friends, and trying to impress his tutor, the brilliant and controversial behavioral scientist James Fieldhead. A single day, however, is enough to turn his calm existence upside down. When he meets the beautiful and enigmatic Cara, and when Fieldhead requests Bens participation in a ground-breaking research experiment, Ben will find himself thrust into a life where every measure of normality is rent asunder.Fieldhead, working in conjunction with a nameless but powerful corporation, has developed a way to measure emotions by tracking the brains physiological responses to stimuli. At his request, Ben submits to having a tiny sensor attached to his skull, and, filled with a guinea pigs pride, is sent off to Kenya with Cara for three weeks of recreation and stimulation. But vacation turns to terror when a case of mistaken identity lands Ben in a Kenyan jail, where the stimulation is anything but positive. Struggling to keep his mental balance, Ben begins wondering whether someone is manipulating the experiment and to what purpose. His search for answers will lead him into the highest corporate boardrooms and into the depths of treachery and betrayal.The novel fairly quivers with energy: reading it is like holding a manic Chihuahua. MacDonald has places to go and things to do and plots to uncover and emotions to stir. And in fact his narrative is generally capable of sustaining this energy. If, on occasion, his grand drama seems to be a tempest in a teapot, well, thats a small (and temporary) price to pay for a highly entertaining read. --Kelly Flynn